https://wiith-archive.ucsc.edu/files/original/e2d421f2aca7e6253507d8c350eea676.JPG 4520042ba3e0b047a90ced89ef021e05 Dublin Core The Dublin Core metadata element set is common to all Omeka records, including items, files, and collections. For more information see, http://dublincore.org/documents/dces/. Title A name given to the resource Recio Family Collection Description An account of the resource Dioscoro "Coro" Respino Recio, Sr. was born in the municipality of Banga, in the region of Aklan, in the Philippines on August 15, 1904. At age fifteen, Dioscoro married and had two daughters. His first wife passed away due to complications during childbirth. On April 22, 1929, he traveled to the United States in search of work to financially support his family who remained in the Philippines. He worked as a farm laborer traveling up and down California’s Central Coast following the crop rotation before eventually settling in the Pajaro Valley. In 1967, Dioscoro met a woman named Sally Anne Dalisay. The two were eventually married, though the exact date of their meeting and their marriage is unknown. Sally Anne was born in Fresno County on August 20, 1944. She was legally blind. Her mother, Beatrice Maxeen Reed, migrated to California from Kansas with her family during the Dust Bowl. Her father, Jose Antaran Dalisay, was a Filipino manong who worked as a farm laborer in Fresno County. Beatrice had four other children: Joanne Antaran Del Carlo (b. 1943), Joe Belgua (b. 1948), Lonna Dalisay (b. 1949), and Donna Dalisay (b. 1949). Beatrice and Jose had a difficult marriage. At the age of five, Sally Anne and her sisters were relocated to an orphanage. While her sisters were adopted, Sally Anne remained at the orphanage into adulthood. Dioscoro and Sally Anne lived in a labor camp on Beach Road in Watsonville. Dioscoro worked as an irrigator at various farms in the Pajaro Valley. Sally Anne stayed at home and took care of their three children: Peter Dalisay Recio (b. 1966), Dioscoro “Roy” Respino Recio, Jr. (b. 1968), and Lynette Dalisay Recio (b. 1975). In 1972, the family moved from the rural labor camp into town. The family's move was facilitated by Rosita Tabasa—a prominent member of the Watsonville Filipino community and the owner of the popular Philippine Gardens Cafe—who assisted them in applying for low-income housing on Green Valley Road. The couple lived in Watsonville for the rest of their lives. Coro passed in January 2004, and Sally Anne passed in March 2018. Contributor An entity responsible for making contributions to the resource Dioscoro "Roy" Respino Recio, Jr. Source A related resource from which the described resource is derived The Recio Family Collection was contributed to Watsonville is in the Heart by Dioscoro and Sally Anne's son, Dioscoro "Roy" Respino Recio, Jr. Roy is the founder of the Tobera Project, a grassroots Filipino American community organization based in Watsonville. The Tobera Project is the community partner for the Watsonville is in the Heart community archive and research initiative. The Recio Family Collection contains five items total. This includes an oral history interview in which Roy reflects on his parents' migration histories, his experience growing up in Watsonville, and his pursuit of community organizing which led him to found the Tobera Project and to pursue a research partnership with the University of California, Santa Cruz. Still Image A static visual representation. Examples include paintings, drawings, graphic designs, plans and maps. Recommended best practice is to assign the type Text to images of textual materials. Original Format The type of object, such as painting, sculpture, paper, photo, and additional data Photograph Dublin Core The Dublin Core metadata element set is common to all Omeka records, including items, files, and collections. For more information see, http://dublincore.org/documents/dces/. Title A name given to the resource Dioscoro Respino Recio Sr. on Main Street Description An account of the resource A photograph of Dioscoro "Coro" Respino Recio Sr. standing on Main Street in downtown Watsonville. The hand-written description on the photograph reads "When you lost your way" and "is all always like this." Date A point or period of time associated with an event in the lifecycle of the resource c. 1930 Contributor An entity responsible for making contributions to the resource Dioscoro "Roy" Respino Recio Jr. Rights Information about rights held in and over the resource Watsonville is in the Heart (WIITH) is a community-driven public history initiative to preserve and uplift stories of Filipino migration and labor in the city of Watsonville and the greater Pajaro Valley. All oral history interviews are donated to WIITH by the narrators. Copyright is held by WIITH. Oral history interview recordings and transcripts are available for unrestricted use and reproduction by educators and researchers. Please note that the recordings on this website are provided via Soundcloud. For access to oral history audio files, please get in touch with the project director at wiith@ucsc.edu. If you are an oral history narrator and would like to remove your interview from the archive website, please contact the project director. Type The nature or genre of the resource Still image Identifier An unambiguous reference to the resource within a given context REC.2021.14 Creator An entity primarily responsible for making the resource unidentified Format The file format, physical medium, or dimensions of the resource unidentified Main Street Manongs Photograph Watsonville